Sunday, January 24, 2010

Recent Book Reviews

The latest list of business book reviews I've posted on suite101.com include the following:

  1. Who Turned Out the Lights? Your Guided Tour to the Energy Crisis, Harper, 2009 by Scott Bittle and Jean Johnson. The link is http://referencebooks.suite101.com/article.cfm/good_consumers_guide_to_energy_crisis.
  2. Complicit How Greed and Collusion Made the Credit Crisis Unstoppable, Bloomberg Press, 2010, by Mark Gilbert. The link to it ishttp://businessbooks.suite101.com/article.cfm/complicit_book_review.
  3. Open by Andre Aggassi, Alfred A. Knopf, 2009. This may not be a business book but it is a very well written autobiography that gives a pretty good idea about the business of tennis. The link is http://athletebiographies.suite101.com/article.cfm/open_book_review.

I'm also working on a new book review, Master Your Debt: Slash Your Monthly Payments and Become Debt Free by Jordan Goodman, and I will post the link to it or put up a summary review here.

Hope you all reading something helpful and really good. If so, let me know what it is...til next time. I got some reading to do.

Saturday, January 02, 2010

Paul Hawken's Green Commerce Books


Paul Hawken is a best selling author of several green commerce books. The Ecology of Commerce (Collins Business, 1993), Natural Capitalism (Little, Brown and Company, 1999), and Blessed Unrest (Penguin Books, 2007).

These three books plus a few others he has written or co-authored have been hailed as some of the most insightful, provocative, and visionary ideas on eco business. Hawken's is a world-renowned environmentalist, small business owner, and highly respected author.

In the book Natural Capitalism, Hawken's presents a fourth type of capital that businesses need to aware of in order to be successful and to be environmentally acurate. The three commonly known capital includes human capital (employees, intelligence), financial capital (cash, investments), manufactured capital (infrastructure, machines, tools, and factories), and the fourth is natural capital (resources, living systems, and ecosystem services).

I've read parts of all three of the books mentioned above. Hawken's is insightful and provides theories and solutions that can easily be recognized as having been thought through to the last detail.

If any business owner, manager, supervisor, or anyone having an interest in learning true environmental theory that can be put into practice, these three books make for a great place to start.